News

15th September 2017 – via the European Association of Dermatology and Venereology
Dermatologists support and call for greater transparency and restriction on the use of isothiazolinones in products. 

19th June 2017 – via Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology
Retrospective analysis of 30,000+ patch tests across Europe from 2013/2014 shows 20% MI allergy in some parts of the continent. 

24th May 2017 – via Dermatitis
Epidemic of Isothiazolinone Allergy in North America: Prevalence Data From the North American Contact Dermatitis Group, 2013-2014. Now almost 12% of patch tested individuals.

24th May 2017 – via Dermatitis
Confirmation that testing with MCI / MI at 0.02% is considerably more efficient at diagnosing that at 0.01% (with no worse adverse reactions in patients).

28th April 2017 – via PLOS ONE
Detrimental effects found in children’s airway function due to exposure to MI / MCI in humidifier disinfectant. 

28th February 2017 – via Cosmetics Design Europe
Very useful article – COSMED provides international overview of methylisothiazolinone. 

28th December 2016 – via Contact Dermatitis
“The use of methylisothiazolinone (MI) in cosmetic products has caused an unprecedented epidemic of MI contact allergy.” 6% of Europeans tested at dermatology clinics have MI allergy. 

20th December 2016 – via Dermatitis
“Wet wipes are an important source of contact allergy. Preservatives are the main allergens, especially isothiazolinones.”

29th November 2016 – via PubMed / JEADV
Data collected by the European Surveillance System on Contact Allergies (ESSCA) network between 2009 and 2012 reveal that MI (4.5%) and MI/MCI (4.1%) were the most prevalent positive patch testing biocide allergens.

7th October 2016 – via PubMed / Contact Dermatitis
Many papers published on methylisothiazolinone (and other isothiazolinone) allergies in the journal, Contact Dermatitis, November 2016 edition. Some of the most notable, summarised by us here, include exposure via trousers and spectacle frames. 

31st August 2016 – via British Journal of Dermatology
New letter: has the epidemic of allergic contact dermatitis due to methylisothiazolinone reached its peak? (See also our analysis here.) 

19th August 2016 – via Contact Dermatitis
Leather treated with an isothiazolinone – in this case, octylisothiazolinone – can trigger contact dermatitis and may sensitise, with potential for cross-reactivity with methylisothiazolinone. 

22nd July 2016 – via EUR-Lex
Amending Annex V to Regulation (EC) No. 1223/2009 re: MI in leave-on products, with full ban to be effective from 12th February 2017. (See also our blog here.)

25th June 2016 – via PubMed
Study confirming cross-reactivity between methylisothiazolinone, octylisothiazolinone and benzisothiazolinone. 

3rd May 2016 – via PubMed
Contact allergies to MI / MCI, formaldehyde and fragrance allergies are significantly associated, according to this Swedish study. 

1st April 2016 – via European Commission
The EC has opened a consultation on methylisothiazolinone (MI) in the framework of Regulation (EC) No. 1223/2009 – rinse-off cosmetic products. Interested parties are invited to submit comments on the proposal (outlined here), to restrict use of MI to 15ppm in rinse-off products, while demanding a ‘contains MI’ labelling message, and to ban it in leave-on hair products. Deadline for submission of comments is 1st July 2016.

19th March 2016 – via PubMed
Abstract of a new study determining the prevalence of MI and MCI allergy in Italian populations – although the figures look to be drawn from those who underwent patch testing NOT the general population. Nevertheless, figures are high, and counter the prevailing view that methylisothiazolinone allergy in Italy and other south European countries was not a serious problem. It is. 

4th March 2016 – via Health Canada
L’Oreal Paris Canada have recalled their Ideal Moisture Dry and Sensitive Day Cream due to possible raised levels of MI in some product samples. Read our blog here for more information. 

14th January 2016 – via PubMed
MI / MCI named as one of the top ten allergens among children suspected of having allergic contact dermatitis, for one third of whom a PEAS (Pre-Emptive Avoidance Strategy) might be worth recommending. 

11th January 2016 – via PubMed
Opinion of the Scientific Committee on Consumer safety (SCCS) on the safety of the use of Methylisothiazolinone (MI) in cosmetic products (sensitisation only).

The EU’s SCCS has reviewed the evidence on the safety of MI as a potential sensitiser in cosmetics, and concluded it is not safe in rinse-off products at a concentration of 100ppm (0.01%) or even 50ppm (0.005%), nor at a level of 100ppm for leave-in hair cosmetic products. For rinse-off cosmetic products, a concentration of 15 ppm (0.0015%) MI is considered safe from the point of view of sensitisation (i.e. it should not sensitise a non-allergic individual to MI) – but of course is not safe for someone already sensitised.
Essentially, the recommendation here is to limit its use to no greater than 0.0015% – which may be too low to be effective.

1st January 2016 – via PubMed
MI should be added to routine patch tests for contact dermatitis in order to identify cases missed from testing only MCI/MI.  

28th December 2015 – via Premium Beauty News
Canada adds new restrictions to the use of MI/MCI. 

4th November 2015 – via JAMA Dermatology
New published study, recommending that patch testing for MI as well as MI/MCI be undertaken in suspected cases of contact dermatitis to an allergen. “Recent regulations by the European Commission have banned MCI-MI in all leave-on body products as of July 16, 2015” it concludes.
(Ed’s note: New products containing MI/MCI blend which are leave-on can no longer be put on the market after this date, but shelves must be cleared of such products and all others from 16th April 2016. Be aware too that leave-on products containing only MI are still permitted beyond this date)

August 2015 – via Skins Matter
A new article, written by Dr Chris Flower, Director-General of CTPA (the UK cosmetic trade association), called An Update on Methylisothiazolinone.

May 2015 – via Via Cosmetic Design Europe
Denmark calls for EU-Wide Ban of Cosmetic Preservative (MI)

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